Archaeological Discoveries In Israel 2013

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Archaeological Discoveries In Israel 2013 – Professor, author and researcher Dr. Ken Hanson returned to discuss the new stone tablet unearthed near the Dead Sea, which contains prophecies about the Messiah as well as revelations from the Angel Gabriel. He’s been studying the 3-ft. tablet, known as the ‘Gabriel Revelation,’ for the last year. Containing 87 lines of Hebrew, the ink is inscribed directly into the stone, which prevents it from being carbon dated, he explained, noting that it’s possible the artifact is a forgery.

But Hanson said he’s come to believe the tablet is genuine. Thought to be made in the decade before Jesus’ birth, it speaks of a messianic figure who will rise from the dead after three days. “The implications are overwhelming,” he said, in that the resurrection of a messiah could be part of Jewish tradition.The ancient Judeans known as the Essenes believed in the coming of two messiahs– one from the priestly branch, the other from the lineage of King David, Hanson pointed out. Archaeological Discoveries In Israel 2013

He also touched on such topics as Kabbalah and the Book of Revelation. Kabbalah, the mystical side of Judaism, has an energy and power to it beyond just rote tradition, he said. Regarding the Book of Revelation, many of its ‘end time’ prophecies could apply to the time it was written in, as well as to other historical periods such as our current one, he commented. Archaeological Discoveries In Israel 2013

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Biography:

Dr. Ken Hanson is a dynamic author, lecturer, and founder of “Treasures in Time,” an organization devoted to disseminating knowledge of the Biblical and classical world. He has dug on archaeological sites in the Middle East, lived in a politically volatile region of northern Galilee, and taught Hebrew on an Israeli agricultural settlement. He has also worked with a television news-gathering operation in a war zone in southern Lebanon, at the height of the civil war that left the jewel of the Mediterranean in ruins.

Wikipedia

Gabriel’s Revelation (also named Hazon Gabriel the Vision of Gabriel) or the Jeselsohn Stone, is a three-foot-tall (one metre) stone tablet with 87 lines of Hebrew text written in ink, containing a collection of short prophecies written in the first person and dated to the late 1st century BCE. One of the stories allegedly tells of a man who was killed by the Romans and resurrected in three days. It is a tablet described as a “Dead Sea scroll in stone”

Origins

The unprovenanced tablet was likely found near the Dead Sea some time around the year 2000 and has been associated with the same community which created the Dead Sea scrolls. It is relatively rare in its use of ink on stone. It is in the possession of Dr. David Jeselsohn, a Swiss–Israeli collector, who bought it from a Jordanian antiquities dealer. At the time, he was unaware of its significance

Kabbalah, also spelled Kabala or Qabbālâ (Hebrew: קַבָּלָה‎ literally “receiving”), is an esoteric method, discipline and school of thought. Its definition varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it, from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism, to its later Christian, New Age, or Occultist syncretic adaptions. Kabbalah is a set of esoteric teachings meant to explain the relationship between an unchanging, eternal and mysterious Ein Sof (no end) and the mortal and finite universe (his creation). While it is heavily used by some denominations, it is not a religious denomination in itself. Inside Judaism, it forms the foundations of mystical religious interpretation. Outside Judaism, its scriptures are read outside the traditional canons of organised religion. Kabbalah seeks to define the nature of the universe and the human being, the nature and purpose of existence, and various other ontological questions. It also presents methods to aid understanding of these concepts and to thereby attain spiritual realisation. Archaeological Discoveries In Israel 2013

Traditional practitioners believe its earliest origins pre-date world religions, forming the primordial blueprint for Creation’s philosophies, religions, sciences, arts and political systems. Historically, Kabbalah emerged, after earlier forms of Jewish mysticism, in 12th- to 13th-century Southern France and Spain, becoming reinterpreted in the Jewish mystical renaissance of 16th-century Ottoman Palestine. It was popularised in the form of Hasidic Judaism from the 18th century onwards. 20th-century interest in Kabbalah has inspired cross-denominational Jewish renewal and contributed to wider non-Jewish contemporary spirituality, as well as engaging its flourishing emergence and historical re-emphasis through newly established academic investigation. Archaeological Discoveries In Israel 2013

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